A Supportive Podcast for those Dealing with a loved one with Memory Loss

A Supportive Podcast for those Dealing with a loved one with Memory Loss

Creativity Is Like Chocolate for the Brain

Creativity Is Like Chocolate for the Brain

00:00:01 – 00:05:04

(Intro)

Does having a creative mind help you avoid Alzheimer’s? Some research has shown that musicians’ brains are more resilient because of the additional neural networks formed while learning their craft. For those of us who are not musically inclined, are there other art forms that may provide the same resilience? Thankfully there may be; writing, painting, drawing,sculpting, and dancing are options that may improve our cognitive health. For caregivers, an art kit specially designed for people living with Alzheimer’s may give us some peace while also allowing your loved one to express themselves creatively. Lola’s Art Kit has the supplies and prompts to facilitate drawing, sculpting, and writing. No matter your age, spending time on a creative passion is an excellent investment in your cognitive health. The bonus you and your loved one can participate together.

(Sponsor Plug)

 This episode is brought to you by Caregiver Chronicles, an eight week online course from diagnosis through hospice for more information. Use the link in the show notes. 

(Jennifer)

Welcome to Fading Memories, a supportive podcast for those caring for a loved one with memory loss. Before we get in the show I thought I’d give you some details on some of the courses that you will receive with caregiver chronicles. It starts from the very beginning with the diagnosis. But you will also get courses on a healthy lifestyle, navigating medical professionals, understanding medication, legal matters, insurance, dealing with durable medical equipment, when a caregiver is needed, finding one, placement, family dynamics, and challenges and conflict,home health, hospice, and planning for your loved ones transition. There are three available one lesson, which includes two private consultations, eight lessons which include four private consultations and their weekly live group invite or all sixteen lessons and a private bonus six private consultations and the weekly live group. I know from personal experience that the more you know about handling this disease the better the outcome will be for everyone, so i urge you to check them out and let them know that you learned about them from the Fading Memories podcast.

 I am excited to welcome Lola Franknoid today. She is the creator of Lola’s Art Kits. They are art kits designed for people specifically with Alzheimer’s. Lola is a caregiver and a creative and i’m excited to learn more about her art kits so join me in welcoming Lola. Thanks for coming on today. 

(Lola)

Yes, thank you for having me!

(Jennifer)

 You’re welcome, so you are an artist but you are also a caregiver. And i love it how caregivers end up – many of us end up coming up with books and ways to help the journey of Alzheimer’s. So why don’t you tell me a little bit about you and your mom.

(Lola)

 Well my mom is no longer with us. But I remember when words started to fail us in communication I felt as an artist  I should be able to do something with her that was nonverbal. And I’ve been teaching art and being director of programs for older adults for thirty years now. So I knew a little bit about the illness. I knew a little bit about how older people respond to art, which is a completely different generation. You know like your comment before we had the interview that they’re afraid to mess up. I mean that’s all part of the generation, as much as it is about the illness. So I came up with prompts rather than leaving blank pieces of paper. I came up with prompts such as enough information about a light bulb they had to finish or a or a dress. And I also came up with prompts with half of the page finished like a beautiful colored kimono and the other half blank so there was enough visual interest in the image but also enough there so they didn’t have to start from scratch.

00:05:05 – 00:10:08

There was something already there for them to continue. And this eases the tension of I don’t know what to do. I’m not an artist, you know all those classic responses that you get and I started looking around the house and just trying these things with her and then coming back and understanding that the kit had value not only for the people that had Altimiezers but also had value for caregivers. Because caregivers as you know we need a break sometimes. 

(Jennifer)

Definitely. 

(Lola) 

This has a built-in design of a self-starter so they could just continue did this work and there’s enough variety and in the art kit. It has clay and it has collages and it has prompts.  So if one doesn’t work one day you can try another exercise and then, of course, I live in San Francisco and USF is doing incredible work on Alzheimer’s and creativity. And they have a center with a gallery and all that and new research is proving that the area of the brain where creativity lies remains intact until the final stages of the illness. So that’s why I wanted to have an art kit that challenged the usual activities that people with Alzheimer’s get is things for children,like little puzzles and nothing – I mean kind of in my opinion a little demeaning when the creativity is there and so my kit is just kind of helping to bring it out. 

(Jennifer)

That makes sense! My mom was resistant to coloring with the basic coloring pages and part of it I think was her visual processing was so bad that she had a very difficult time deciphering what was inside the lines and outside the lines. And that makes it a challenge and with your prompts and I saw on the video so you had like a half-light bulb outline and then some people when they completed it wasn’t a light bulb it was other things. I’m wondering if that would have been better for her, although when i was attempting to do creative things with her as a way of engaging with her she was definitely much closer to the end of her life so that might have been why it was such a struggle. It did not ever try clay mostly because she was in memory care residents and carrying all that stuff around was kind of a challenge.

(Lola)

Yeah and the kit contains this little package of paper clay supposedly. It’s supposed to be soft and it dries naturally so you don’t have to bake it or do anything. And I have prompts for that too so I don’t let people get frustrated. I tried to lessen the amount of frustration as much as possible. And people in the group I was teaching at the Institute on Aging for a while and there are people who would start with the art kit kinda like exercise would and then would just one a piece of paper kind of after the warm-up to go on their own and do abstractions. Which are welcome I mean I would show lots of images of people doing abstractions and that wasn’t in their vocabulary so it was teaching a little bit of art history too. With my permission to do abstractions and have it be valid and wonderful and expressive art. 

(Jennifer)

That was what  I tried to get my mom to do. But maybe like I said, she was probably too far into the disease. She also was a seamstress and she did woodworking and acrylic painting.

00:10:08 – 00:15:01

No she did oil painting too,  that was back in the seventies so we’re going back a little way. And I’m wondering if all of what she did was very precise and that’s why she, you know it wasn’t like here’s a pile of stuff create something. It was like to follow these directions and have a dress. She liked to do the wood cutouts like I have a reindeer with the light bulb for a nose that we put out every Christmas time. And so that was the kind of thing. You have to be a little bit precise when you’re cutting wood and fabric. So I wonder if that was one of her issues. 

(Lola)

Yeah, we bring our history and she had standards for herself and it’s hard to let go of those. You know.

(Jennifer)

 I believe that ’cause I had tried like leaf rubbings, one guest that I had suggested finger painting, another person said that that was too childish and demeaning like you said and again I didn’t – I always went and visited her after a meeting so i didn’t want to have to pack a huge bag of stuff to lug around and then we always ended up going to the park and watching kids or in the not as great weather we’d go to the library. I happen to be on the other side of the mountain from you so I’m in the hot part of the state. I’m in Brentwood so we’re like forty-five miles apart. I don’t think I’ve talked to anybody in San Francisco for quite a while so this is kind of a treat. I know in the kits you also have collages. How do those work? 

(Lola)

 Well, again to give a caregiver an easier time I have collage images already there and a pair of safety scissors. So it’s basically cutting the images and just from what you said I have images of food, children, and pets. I mean everyone loves those so they could cut those and there’s a glue stick and there’s a choice thereof where they wanna place it on the paper and what they want next to it. So that’s the beauty of collage that it’s very much in the moment and there are no skills required for them, they can just play with the images and glue them and then I always encourage them to use watercolor for the background. So it could grow into something different and they really liked that. And at the classes that I’ve taught at workshops, they also like looking into magazines and telling me which images they like and then we would cut them and work with them. So things that are already made and are already present in the world you start them with, and then once they’re hooked with their creativity it just kind of happens.

(Jennifer)

 I can see that. I was smiling because of kids and pets. My mom had dogs all her life except for the last year and a half, when she moved into the memory care residence she actually had her black miniature poodle with her so they were there together for about a year and a half until they renovated the entire community. And then miss not too cooperative on going outside to do her business. She needed to be rehomed which the timing on that was pretty good because at that point she was more like the handbag that my mom carted around all the time. It was just there, it didn’t have a purpose or meaning so I mentioned that because I have three golden retrievers. I don’t want people to think I just got rid of the dog. It was a difficult decision for my sister and I but I wonder, I was thinking if I had cut out the images for her if that would have helped her but I don’t know, I  think she was too – I think I attempted to do creative stuff with her too late in the disease.

(Lola)

 Before we go any further. I’m here to release you from the guilt of what do with your mom.

00:15:01 – 00:20:08

It’s now disappeared. You are free from it.

(Jennifer

 I tried. 

(Lola)

 This is the caregiver’s guilt that we carry about what else we could have done. And it’s very natural to feel that way but we did the best we could. 

(Jennnifer)

That is true and she loved going out and watching the kids in the park and you know sitting in the park sometimes I would read, sometimes I’d answer emails on my phone. 

(Lola)

Nothing wrong with that.

(Jennifer)

 Yeah, I liked it, it worked. It wasn’t the most exciting way to spend an afternoon but you know, it made her happy and that was what was important. So I know another part of your kits is you have like a section that’s got like prompts for writing which really kind of blew me away because that was definitely beyond my mom at this point.

(Lola)

Well, there are some older people that are not visual artists and I can’t transform them just because of my will. So I put some into writing so I put some really non-linear photographs of people in situations like there are some people having a drink in the office toasting something and so people would get curious and then right what they thought was happening in these photographs. And some of them got to be short stories but again it’s giving them a prompt. It’s giving them something that they can continue that they can think about and for a caregiver that has mom waking up at three in the morning and wants to go back to sleep or needs to pay the bills or something just to have them do a page of the art kit and it can be very helpful. 

(Jennifer)

How long did your mom have Alzheimer’s? 

(Lola)

I think she had it for about six years.

(Jennifer)

I haven’t met too many people that got to walk Alzheimer’s journey for twenty. 

(Lola)

Wow!

(Jennifer)

 I actually think my mom started showing signs of cognitive impairment in the summer of nineteen ninety-five which put her at fifty-two and a half but it was definitely an issue after the turn of the century. Which sounds really strange. We had a business together and she would take orders from clients and not write down due dates directions or anything useful to get it completed properly. And so we walked the journey long enough that I actually don’t remember when her mind was good which is really sad. I started in two thousand seventeen with her trying to do some just really basic creative stuff that you can’t screw up. I mean you can screw up art but it might still look interesting. That was what I used to tell her is that she can’t screw up. Don’t worry about it. Just have fun and it made her really really tense and anxious. So I didn’t continue pursuing much of that very often because obviously making her tense and stressed is not the end goal. Was your mom creative prior to you creating these art kits and introducing them to her? 

(Lola)

 Well, she was an amazing cook. And I remember as the illness progressed I would find her like making things you know. Baking things, using all the hand movements as if she was making her recipes which she adored to bake and all sorts of things so that kinda gave me a hint that there was something that needed to be explored. It was something there that I could bring out and after coming back home I started developing all these activities. And so she had passed away before the art kit was finished and being sold. And it’s really interesting how it sells all over the world.

00:20:08 – 00:25:04

I mean it I look at the map of where these kits go and sometimes they’re like little towns in France and I mean that’s just so wonderful that the internet can do that. That can spread the word.

(Jennifer)

 Definitely! I wouldn’t have a podcast if it wasn’t for the internet and a fast internet connection. 

(Lola)

Yes so if you don’t mind if I can give the website so people can- 

(Jennifer)

 Definitely and it will also be hot-linked in the show notes.

(Lola)

Oh good, so the website is arttimeprograms.com, all one-word dot com.

(Jennifer) 

All you have to scroll down on the show notes and you can click on it. You can go right to her page on that website. I already checked it out. It’s very affordable. And for what you’re getting and you’re getting a lot of help and the supplies which I’m a creative person. I like to make greeting cards because I didn’t want to – I’m not good at painting. I’m also a photographer. You can only have so many things hanging on the walls or so many quilts or so many whatever and at the beginning of the pandemic, I decided that I would make cards for the residence where my mom lived and it’s kind of expanded into friends and the owner of the restaurant that my husband goes to like almost daily. She’s like I’ll take some cards for the staff for Christmas.

(Lola)

 What do you use to make your cards?

(Jennifer)

 They’re all like little dye cuts and embossing folders and inks and glitter. You know that stuff that gets everywhere. What’s really interesting is I liked the quote that you had in your video is creativity is like chocolate to the brain. It’s actually Dr. Jean Cohen’s.

(Lola)

 Yes. Dr. Jean Cohen was a doctor that spent all his life investigating creativity and the brain. So I’ve read all of his books. And I really recommend them because they’re amazing. But I just love this quote that creativity is like chocolate to the brain.

(Jennifer)

 Well, I agree ’cause I liked to have chocolate and then make cards and the other day I was like it must stop because I’m starving I need to go have dinner. I’ve been doing it for hours. And I just either listen to music or listen to podcasts which is kind of funny. But it’s just you can just lose yourself in it and it’s about one of the things that have kept me from going completely insane because I already worked from home.

(Sponsor Plug) 

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(Lola)

Tell me a little bit about what you do with this podcast?

(Jennifer)

 I talk to wonderful people like you and share all kinds of information and support and inspiration to family caregivers and I do also have listeners that are paid caregivers or they’re the activity director at a community. So this is definitely something that they should be interested in and I’m always looking for options for what to do with your loved one because that’s actually how the podcast started.

00:25:04 – 00:30:04

I would go visit my mom and she would say so what have you been up to lately. And I would tell her oh I just came from a Rotary meeting. Now my dad was a Rotarian for forty-five years. My husband and I are Rotarians. My paternal grandfather was Rotarians. So that was something that had enough historical context that she knew what I was talking about and she’d say oh was your dad there or was Chuck there. She thought I was her best friend so it was a little odd to refer to my dad as Chuck. But that’s what we did and then she’d like literally in three or four minutes she’d say, so what have you been up to lately. And I’d say well you know this morning i went to the gym. And then you know had some lunch. Oh okay and then she asked me again and after about the fifth time ugh I have to explain my entire day. And I had people tell me well you should just make stuff up and that always felt wrong which wouldn’t have been but this was my mom and I wanted to be respectful.

 But I learned that trying to be respectful actually causes more problems so I did deep dives on the internet. I read books and did google searches and literally, my eyes were blurry and my brain was just like mush and then i would try these different things that were suggested in the books or the internet or wherever. And when it was a spectacular failure I thought man people who are caring for their loved one at home, like their parent or spouse don’t have time for all this insane research that I’ve been doing especially when you don’t come up with a decent answer. So one driving to the gym and the podcast that – I had twelve minute podcast perfect for the amount of time I needed to get to the gym. And they were talking about starting a podcast. I’m like oh I should go and check and see if there’s one on Alzheimer’s caregiving and this was in twenty the twenty seventeen.  And I looked and there was one and I played a couple episodes but it just didn’t speak to me. You know like I’m a tea drinker. I love the smell coffee. Don’t want it. There’s you know so it was kind of that kind of thing. It’s like I can see how people would like the podcast but it just didn’t speak to me so then I heard another podcast on how to start a podcast so I was like oh I can do that .So that’s what i did and I have learned so much from talking to people like you and I wish I learned a lot of it much sooner because as i said my mom died at the March twenty twenty. But knowing what I’ve learned in the last two and a half almost three years I  wanna keep sharing that with people because you know you never know what works. I had a guest whose husband was very smart and not creative at all and one day she just put pencils and crayons and other drawing implements in front of them and just blank paper and he said what do you want me to draw? And she said whatever makes you happy and his very basic drawings are the illustrations in the book that she wrote after he passed away. So I know that would not have worked with my mom. Like you said the prompts work a lot better. So these are kind of my opinion is that sometimes you got to try things and find what doesn’t work because that’s what you usually find faster. 

(Lola)

And so if I may say, the stages affect people in different ways. Some people when they actually just completely lose their memory are free of that judgment and start being more creative. I have found that many people some people hold onto their identity till the very very end so but then sometimes the illness has a way of changing people. My mom became funnier and softer with the illness as it progressed. So there’s a difference you know within people and the stages of Alzheimer’s too. 

(Jennifer)

Yeah well everybody physically and mentally are different and the disease affects different parts of the brain. So  while Alzheimer’s is very similar across the spectrum it’s also very different. Because my mom, the reason my mom passed away as she was fighting with the caregivers and fell and broke her leg and died in two and a half weeks. So we hear that you know Aunt Betty was really healthy until she fell and broke her hip and then died in two weeks.

00:30:05 – 00:35:00

That was kind of what happened with my mom because she was still extremely verbal. None of what she said made sense. And this is one of the one of the things where I learn things that don’t work and why trying to be respectful always backfired on me. She would speak a sentence and it was all very clear words but they didn’t – there was no grammatical context or historical context. And I always thought it was proper or  respectful or  whatever you wanna call it to try to figure out what she was telling me so that i could respond with something other than oh yeah okay. That sounds interesting. Oh yeah yeah. That’s a good idea. Or whatever some generic blah blah blah and if I scrunched up my face and tried to like get in her mind. She would immediately get angry so I had to learn really quick not to ever do that. I just started way too late in the game. But then I would just like there was a day where she told me that her brothers were normal people now and I went. Oh I’m so glad to hear your brothers are normal people now. 

(Lola)

I learned that lesson too is like I’m gonna be where you are all the way and support whatever fiction or non fiction you’re at and we’re gonna communicate the best way we can without judgement. And I would get upset when she lost her train of thought at the beginning. That was bad for me you know it created deep sorrow and anxiety. And I mean the purpose was to be together and communicate as well as we could and she was in charge, I felt.

(Jennifer) 

 That’s interesting. My mom always hung onto being a caregiver herself. She walked up until the day she broke her leg, so she walked, she talked.  I mean alot of people did not fully understand how advanced her Alzheimer’s was including me to a point and I feared that she would literally just walk and mumble for years. So I don’t know if falling and breaking her leg was a blessing for all of us. It was a little bit of a shock that she went on us. But considering everything that’s happened in twenty twenty I think she might have had a little clarity and she can see in the future and she’s like never mind I’m not interested. 

(Lola) 

Gosh yes it’s been so hard on older adults with Covid and having that extra stress where she couldn’t eat with other people or have to be in her room the whole time yes. 

(Jennifer) 

She was in her room because she was-  You know it’s bad when the surgeons don’t wanna do surgery so she was bed bound and she’d already started having trouble eating and a lot of it was I don’t think she recognized food as food which was really strange. But she always wanted to help the other residents, the ones that were on walkers or you know she would pop her head out the door and say well if there’s anything you need just let me know.  And I had the hardest time not snickering when she’d say that ’cause like you can’t help that woman, you can hardly help yourself so that was who my mom was but she got very aggressive at the end which was very difficult. But i’m glad that I didn’t you know between Covid and our incredibly hot couple of weeks and then the fires we had with the really horrific air quality.

 I don’t think I’ve ever seen air quality that bad where we live in my entire life. You know I’m really glad that I didn’t have to try to figure out what to do with mom this year not being able to go watch kids at the pool. Which I know sounds a little creepy or the park. She liked it hot so we can go sit in the park when it was one hundred degrees. And I’d be dying and she’d be really happy. And she loved to watch kids so that was that was her thing an I was fine with it but i had earlier on wished for a little bit more interaction,  a little bit more engagement but I think that that was – I think i was too late to try to introduce that. But that’s kind of what I’m trying to share with the podcast is let people know where I was at and what I was trying to do and why it did or didn’t work. So that maybe they can save themselves some frustrations or they can say oh it didn’t work for her because she waited too long.

00:35:00 – 00:40:01

But my mom is mid stages or whatever. 

(Lola)

You may be talking and echoing someone’s own experience exactly and just things someone else that went through the same experience is very helpful.

(Jennifer)

 I hope so. That’s the whole point.

(Lola)

 Yes! 

(Jennifer)

 It’s a labor of love. I spent a lot of time working on this. It’s also kept me sane. Fortunately I don’t need the money ’cause I’m not making money podcasting yet but that’s okay because I love talking to people like you and sharing what I’ve learned.

(Lola)

 Thank you for doing what you do, it’s important. 

(Jennifer)

 You’re welcome and you touched on it really quick and i didn’t get a chance to ask. Is the art gallery that you were talking about for the older people, is that always at UCSF or is it-

(Lola)

Yes! If you just type UCSF Alzheimer’s Center and they have this thing where they have artists and residents work with subjects about Alzheimer’s and mental illness. They have a gallery and most important they do all the research on creativity and the brain and I find it fascinating. And they have lectures that you can be part of so look into that.

(Jennifer)

Well since it’s not terribly far, although get to UCSF from where I live is not easy because you actually have to drive.

(Lola)

But right now they’re having zoom lectures and stuff. 

(Jennifer)

That’s really cool.

(Lola)

 So i’m going to send you an email with the link for that. 

(Jennifer)

That’d be great ’cause i’m very interested in creativity and the brain because –

(Lola)

And the person in charge of that whole world of creativity and the brain. His name is Bruce Miller and he’s a very important person in the Alzheimer’s research world. 

(Jennifer)

Cool! Well I would definitely check into that. I do so many things on zoom. Zoom town halls with representatives and my whole life is on zoom these days. When I’m not walking the dogs or making cards I’m probably on the computer.

(Lola)

 Yes, I called my husband a zoombie. 

(Jennifer)

Yeah that’s good. I like that! I joke because I’ve been on zoom for a little over two years and I used to have to explain how to log on and even though it’s very simple. Many of my guests are in their seventies and eighties so one of them referred to herself as a tech klutz, which I love.  And we had a challenge but she got it solved. That was great. But there are times when I’ve logged into zoom. I actually had to have one guest turn off video because there were so many people zooming I guess at that point in the daytime that it just when his video was on it just broke up. It was like I was talking to somebody on mars and as soon as he turned the video off the audio was fine.

(Lola)

 So the other thing that I’m doing right now is creating mini art kits. So when people pick up there – I mean the senior centers are still closed here but  they’re still driving to get their lunches. When they pick up their lunch they also pick up a mini arkit so they can work at home whether it’s a loved one or themselves driving they get that with their meal.

(Jennifer)

 That’s a fantastic idea. Even even when the senior centers reopen. That’s not a bad idea for people just because you know there’s hours in the week.

(Lola)

 Yes especially at night. 

(Jennifer)

Yes I didn’t have to deal with that with my mom but closer to the end she started getting up at like two or three o’clock in the morning and that’s really not her. So she and I are very similar. We’ll fall asleep in front of the tv then stagger to bed. And then sleep till seven o’clock but you know with the requisite getting up to use the restroom overnight. Yeah so it was you know. I wish I could have helped her be her creative self earlier on in life. But my dad was not interested in assistance or her going to an adult day program where that might have been encouraged so.  

(Lola)

Remember, I released you from that.

(Jennifer)

 Yes yes yes.

00:40:01 – 00:44:24

I know I did the best I could. I still it’s just there’s, we always wish we could have done just a little bit more.

(Lola)

Ah yes this is the caregiver thing. You just feel that way. And it’s out of love. 

(Jennifer) 

That is true. So is there any, do you have a quick tip on how to get people started when they get  the kit? 

(Lola)

Well when they get the kit, the kit comes with instructions which are very simple and each activity comes also with instructions and how to get started and what to do. Sometimes it’s hard to have the caregiver not play such an important role. I mean they just wanna do it for mom or something. And that’s always a challenge for me because i know it comes from a good place but I want mom to explore creativity without so much assistance and judgement from you know whoever is sitting next to them so it’s a fine line. I mean you wanna encourage. And Ialways want daughters and sons to be part of it but not to get too intrusive. 

(Jennifer)

Right. Well I appreciate this chat this afternoon. So does my furry friend down here that  is off camera. But I’m sure the people listening can hear him. 

(Lola)

I can hear him.

(Jennifer)

 Yeah he loves his momma. He wanted to be with me so he came up the stairs. He is almost thirteen so he’s an old guy but he’s a healthy guy but the stairs are hard for him. I joke on my social media and sometimes if you listen really closely you can hear either snoring or heavy breathing in the background of the podcast and it’s always him so keep me.

(Lola)

 Keep me informed about future podcasts you’re having and I’ll tune in there. 

(Jennifer)

They are every tuesday wherever you listen to podcasts. Do you  listen to any at all right now? 

(Lola)

 Yes! 

(Jennifer)

 Okay so on apple, spotify, there’s like i don’t know so many places to listen. 

(Lola)

Yes I can do that. 

(Jennifer)

Okay and if you go in the email you can go to my website. It also takes you to the different links for each specific show and I will definitely let you know when yours is coming out. I think it’s either late November or early December. I forgot to bring the clipboard over here with the list on it. But this has been a lot of fun. 

(Lola)

Thank you so much. 

(Jennifer)

 I’m definitely going to check out the creativity and the brain research because obviously that’s right up my alley.

(Lola)

 I mean get Jean Collins books, you would love the books.

(Jennifer)

 I will check into that too. Well I appreciate this tremendously today. 

(Lola)

Thank you so much.

(Jennifer)

 You’re welcome and I will let you know if anything exciting is happening.

(Lola)

 All right. good luck.

(Outro)

 I hope you enjoyed that conversation enough to share with friends and family. And while you’re at it could you head over to apple podcast and leave a rating. Possibly a review. Even if you’ve done this in the past this helps new caregivers find this podcast and we’re still growing so we really appreciate the assistance. While you’re on the computer, pop on over to my website. It’s about as done as it will ever be. I believe it  will always be a work in progress. There are articles and recipes and  all kinds of fantastic information. While you’re there make sure to sign up for the newsletter that way you’ll never miss anything interesting and with our busy lives. I know that’s really easy to do.

 And there’s always. I’ll be in your ears again next tuesday.